Packing It All In

Packing in all the stuff we need for six weeks is no easy task. Then we looked at the pile of stuff we had set aside for our friends in Almaty and Karaganda. Big Mistake. But no problem, Mark came over and dialed us in. (Thanks to him too for bringing over Tina and Vicky's Tortilla Soup last night.) He could have fit three former Ukranian dictators in that bag. Complicating the packing is the fact that from LAX to Almaty, we're allowed 70 pounds per bag, 2 bags per person. On the flight from Almaty to our final destination, we're allowed only 44 pounds PER PERSON. We packed the top of the bags with baby stuff and supplies for the orphanage, and will pray for a "humanitarian" exemption on the weight limits. Hopefully they won't see the four pound bag of malt balls under all the pediatric necessities!

Thoughtful Friends

Wall of Mourning

As we pack and get ready for our trip, and try to gather as many things for friends living overseas as we possibly can, our friends here have donated over $750 for orphans and other children in Kazakhstan. World Vision established a relief fund in the last few days for the victims of the earthquake and tsunamis in Asia (www.worldvision.org), as has Amazon (http://tinyurl.com/6up4w), and both have experienced overwhelming response.

Paper Chase

Got papers? The process began in late August 2003.  We had to apply to our agency,  Christian World Adoption, and start the process  with the INS, which is now called the BCIS.  While waiting on a

In the Beginning

The beginning of our story starts with a long beginning. From the moment we miraculously resolved our ongoing discussion over having a fourth child, the solution became easy: we would adopt. Within days we were registered with an experienced international adoption agency, and had mentally committed to reams of bureaucratic paperwork ("a day in the life" at my job), and a trip to Guatemala.

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